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Leds


Primeiramente gostaria de salientar que não sou o autor principal do conteúdo deste artigo. A minha intenção é de mostrar o que outros autores tem realizado (referenciando links para o conteúdo original) neste blog até como um guia pessoal para uso próprio e ainda compartilhar minhas anotações e pequenas modificações que realizo no conteúdo, desejando que possa ajudar mais alguém em algum lugar.
First and foremost, I take no credit for any of this post’s content. I am really just taking what others have done (which I have links to bellow) and am putting it on my blog for a personal reference and hopefully the small changes that I made to their guides will help someone somewhere.


link: http://www.evilmadscientist.com/2012/resistors-for-leds/

Basics: Picking Resistors for LEDs


link: http://raspberrypi.stackexchange.com/questions/4357/why-is-a-resistor-needed-for-leds

The reason is common to all LED applications, not just Raspberry Pi (or the GPIO pins).

An LED can only pass so much current before it will destroy itself (very brightly!). The maximum current varies by the LED's size and colour, but for a medium-sized red LED can usually be assumed to be 20mA (check this value though, if you have the spec sheet for the LED handy - and tiny LEDs can only handle a tiny fraction of this).

A standard red LED usually has a voltage drop of around 1.7v, and so the value of the resistor can be chosen to pass 20mA at (voltage - 1.7). Assuming an input of 5v, this means a resistor that will pass 20mA at 3.3v, which (using Ohm's Law) gives us an absolute minimum resistance of 165 ohms.

The worst that can happen by using a larger resistor, is that the LED will be dimmer than its maximum brightness, and so in order to accommodate smaller LEDs that can only pass 10mA, it's not uncommon to use 330 ohms and above.

I'd put a 470-ohm resistor in for a 5v supply for a medium-sized red LED, and if the LED is way too dim then reduce it slightly.

If using a miniature red LED, then 1K ohms does not sound outrageous, and for more exotic colours (in particular blue, pink and white), you will want to calculate the value yourself.


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